If you have a medium and large company and do not know which light rate to choose, at Lumisa we answer your questions!

According to Royal Decree 1164/2001, of October 26, which establishes access tariffs for the transmission and distribution networks of electric energy, the access tariffs are classified into low and high voltage tariffs. Therefore, we have this classification:

Low voltage rates.

They will be applied to supplies made at voltages not exceeding 1 kV being the rate 2.0A, 2.0DHA, 2.1A, 2.1DHA and 3.0A.

High voltage rates.

They will be applied to supplies made at voltages higher than 1 kV and are the following:

- Rate 3.1A, specifies three periods for supplies in voltages between 1 to 36 kV and contracted power equal to or less than 450 kW.

- Rate 6, general access tolls for high voltage, being applicable in any supply in voltages between 1 to 36 kV and contracted power exceeding 450 kW.

3.1A access fee.

The 3.1A access rate will be applied to supplies in voltages between 1 and 36 kV with contracted power in all tariff periods equal to or less than 450 kW. Its characteristics are:

  • - Connected to the medium-high voltage network: 1kV <T <36 kV
  • - Contracted power of less than 450 kW
  • - Hourly discrimination with three periods.

The 3.1A rate is generally intended for medium and large companies.

One of the most outstanding characteristics is that it has three periods in the energy term, and three in the power term, allowing to select the price of each period, according to our demand and circumstances, always respecting the legal basis. That is, the contracted power of the period P3 must be equal to or greater than the period P2, and this in turn, must be equal to or greater than that of the period P1, all being less than 450 kW.

1.- Period Tip: Being the most expensive price. It covers 6 hours a day and is the most expensive.

  • Winter: from 5pm to 11pm
  • Summer: from 10am to 4pm

2.- Plain Period: Being the average price. It covers 10 hours a day, being of an average price.

  • Winter: from 8am to 5pm and 11pm to 12pm
  • Summer: from 8 am to 10 am and 4 pm to midnight
  • Saturday, Sunday and Holidays: from 6pm to midnight

3.- Valley Period: Being the cheapest price. It covers 8 night hours, being the cheapest price.

  • Winter and summer: from 0h to 8h
  • Saturday, Sunday and Holiday: 0h to 18h


* The summer time change is the last Sunday of March according to Directive 2000/84/CE.
* The winter time change is the last Sunday of October according to Directive 2000/84/CE.


Table 3.1A tariff schedule regulated in the Third Additional Provision of Order ITC / 3801/2008, of December 26, by which electricity rates are revised as of January 1, 2009.

The cycle of reading of the 3.1A rate is monthly and the contracted power is measured through the maximeter. In this case, if the contracted power is exceeded, the penalty for excess power regulated in RD 1164/2001 will be applied. The Maximeter is responsible for recording the maximum power demanded in each of the billing periods, so that they later appear on the bill of the Light we emit.

What happens when we exceed the contracted Power?

Three assumptions can be made, depending on the maximum power demanded with respect to the contracted one:

1.- Less than 85%: If the maximum power demanded in the period to be invoiced is less than 85% of the contracted power, the power to be invoiced will be equal to 85% of said contracted power.

2.- Between 85 and 105%: If the maximum power demanded, registered during the billing period, is within 85 to 105% of the contracted one, said registered power will be the power to be billed. The maximum power that has been demanded will be billed, exactly the one reflected by the maximeter.

3.- Greater than 105%: If the maximum power demanded, registered in the billing period, is greater than 105% of the contracted power, the power to be billed in the period considered will be equal to the registered value plus double the difference between the registered value and the value corresponding to 105 percent of the contracted power.

We find it regulated in RD 1164/2001, of October 26, which establishes access rates to the transport and distribution networks of electric energy.

That is why it is very important to properly choose the contracted power, since a bad choice can cause excesses in the invoices if the power is lower, as well as penalties if it is lower than the defendant.

Importance of the grounding installation.
Previous

Importance of the grounding installation.

What are the obligations of the Distribution Companies?
Next

What are the obligations of the Distribution Companies?

Call 900 811 473 or we can call you at an available time